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accomplish? journalists and foreign policy expert a fellow at the institute of peace and wood row wilson international center joins us to talk about a few things we learned from the president's trip. first of all, you say it changed the diplomatic climate of the middle east. is that a little too optimistic? and how so? >> well, the most important thing to come out of this trip was the deal between turkey and israel. turkey is the most powerful muslim country of the 57 nations with strong muslim populations. and this makes a lot of other things possible, whether it's cooperation on syria, whether it gives the blessing to the islamic world dealings with israel, which is widely viewed as kind of an outpost of the west. so it changes the atmosphere in a lot of ways. >> robin, we always talk about the red line if you will when it comes to dealing with iran. it seemed as if at least in this trip the president successfully turned down the volume a little bit in trying to get on the same page with israel and that red line. >> well, this has been the biggest point of tension between president oba
netanyahu and called the u.s. and the jewish state unbreakable. mr. obama also covered big foreign policy issues including the iranian threat and the civil war in syria. cnn's john king is live in jerusalem with the latest. john, all seemed very maty and chummy. but underneath all that, what is the reality of the state of the relationship between america and israel right now? >> reporter: there's no question, piers, obvious to the world, not just to these two leaders, they've had a frosty and unfriendly relationship. president obama is left of center, believes the prime minister netanyahu has said some things he finds insulting or didn't like. prime minister netanyahu right of center, supported romney in the last presidential election, has at times stopped at president obama, my language, doesn't get it. both of these guys just won elections. they are in the words of a top american official the other day, stuck with each other. and it's very crystal clear today, both of them have decided to try to turn a new page. are they going to be best friends, i think not. but are they going to be be
back in the '90s. he's now the vice president director of the foreign policy program at the brookings institution here in washington. he's joining us from new york. martin, i thought this was one of the most important speeches that an american president has ever delivered about the situation between the israelis and the palestinians. but give me your thoughts. >> i agree, wolf. you said it was bold. i would say it was courageous. not just in terms of making the case to the israeli public, that they do have a partner, that peace is possible, but actually urging them to pressure their leaders to move forward. he is famously being quoted before our elections as saying that he considered the leadership in israel as political cowards. he seems to be going over their heads to the israeli young people, trying to give them hope and trying to encourage them to press their leaders to make peace. and that is, i think, a very bold and courageous thing. but i would say one other thing. he, having tried to lower expectations about this visit, has now raised them sky high in terms of the expectation
immigration, foreign policy, and jams in the politics lead. ♪ wireless is limitless. [ female announcer ] from finding the best way... ♪ to finding the best catch... ♪ wireless is limitless. ♪ ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. >>> the politics lead. republican leaders in congress looking for momentum on immigration reform got a boost from senator and tea party fave rand paul. paul spoke this morning at the u.s. hispanic chamber of commerce setting a tone that reminded some of president george w. bush. >> i think the conversation needs to start by acknowledging that we aren't going to deport 12 million illegal immigrants. if you wish to work, if you wish to live and work in america then we will find a place for you. >> joining us right now for reaction to this and other news of the day of course is senator marco rubio, republican of florida. senator, thanks for joining us. what is your reaction to rand paul's announcement today? how important is this to the cause of immigration reform? >> well, first
those ones relative to foreign policy end up sometimes driving the most passionate dust up. but look, we have four great senators that you've mentioned there. they all have very differing ideas. they are all part of our caucus and bring a lot to it. i think it's time to move on and focus on those things that unite us. look, i really do think it's healthy that people are being as outspoken as they are right now, and hopefully that will lead to some unification down the road. >> senator corker, always good to have you here in "the situation room." thank you. >> thank you. >>> there are very few places left in new york where you can smoke them, and now mayor michael bloomberg wants to make it so you can't see them. up next, controversy over his plan to force stores to hide cigarettes. i don't make any decisions about who to hire without going to angie's list first. you'll find reviews on home repair to healthcare written by people just like you. with angie's list, i know who to call, and i know the results will be fantastic. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. >>> he's gone after trans f
the detention facility at guantanamo consistent with the national security and foreign policy interests of the united states and interest of justice i hereby order. >> barbara star, pentagon correspondent, is at the pentagon and sunny hostin is in new york. barbara, to you first, what more do we know about their protests, and how is it being handled? >> well, there are a couple of things happening here, don. some of them have regularly protested now for years, and the medical protocol if there is a doctor's decision, yes, they are fed through a tube. some of them have joined this hunger on and off again hunger strike recently, we're told, because of protests over searches in their living area for koran, the holy book of islam. military officials tell us only islamic personnel, translators, if you will, actually touch the korans during the searches of their cells, u.s. military personnel do not touch the koran. but this has led to some of the protests and is one of the reasons behind the growing hunger strike. >> sunny, to you now, if a prisoner wants to refuse food, is that not their le
. >> we all no asia is on the rise. he served as singapore's foreign secretary and the dean of the country's school of public policy. he has a new book out "the great convergence, asia, the west and the logic of one world." welcome back. you start the book with good news. since everybody in the united states and the west has been feeling blue, tell us what the good news is with and why we should be happy. >> actually i'm surprised by the kind of level of posseessimism europe and america. the world has never been in better shape if you look at the view. the number was dying in dying in conflicts is the lowest it has ever been. in term of global poverty the only u.n. goal is having more than having by 2015. and the middle class, and this is a really stunning news, if you look at where asia is today, they are 500 million people living in middle-class living standards today in 2013 in asia. by 2020, which is seven years in now, the number will explode from 500 million to 1.75 billion. an increase of 3.5 times in seven years. we've never seen this before in human history. that's going to change
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)